Happy New Year!

Happy New Year, Filmspotters! We have a very exciting year ahead with some new venues and exciting ventures planned. We’re currently working on a brand new website, and a new ticketing system so soon you’ll be able to buy tickets for most of our events over the web. Final versions of two of our workshop films will also be launched online shortly.

We have some great events already booked, including a special charity dance screening of Jacob Krupnick’s debut feature, ‘Girl Walk // All Day’ at Alive Fitness in Brighton; and a gala performance of ‘A Cottage on Dartmoor’ with Joss Peach performing his own score of the film, live, at the stunning All Saints Chapel, Eastbourne. More details on both of these screenings – and more – to come later in the year.

We thought we’d kick off the year with a cinematic party, though! So, here are some picks of our favourite parties on film:

Labyrinth

We thought we’d start with every 80s child’s dream: Jim Henson puppets made to Brian Froud’s magical designs, Jennifer Connolly in a big ball gown with even bigger hair… and David Bowie in spandex. What more could anybody in their right mind want or need?

Dazed and Confused

Richard Linklater, one of our favourite directors, is responsible for one of the finest coming of age films. Set on the first day, and night, of summer vacation in 1976 for the kids at Lee High School in Austin, Texas, it follows their revelry to an impromptu keg party, which looks pretty much as any get-together with practically an entire school’s worth of kids would look.

Mood Indigo

L’Ecume Des Jours – Dance scence from Barazzi on Vimeo.

Another of director Michel Gondry’s cinematic daydreams, based on the book ‘L’Ecume Des Jours’ by Boris Vian, ‘Mood Indigo’ features some impressive dance moves…

Mad Monster Party

Ok, so this isn’t exactly a ‘classic’, but it is silly and fun… and has some delightfully stiff stop motion dancing!

All About Eve

I think any party featuring the razor-tongued Bette Davies warning attendees to ‘fasten your seat belts’ would qualify as one to go to….

Well, whatever you were doing for New Year, we hope you had a great one – and are sending you all our best wishes for the new year ahead: maybe we’ll see you soon at one of our screenings!

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A night at the opera with Filmspot

Hello Filmspotters!
We are getting tuned up and ready for our screening of Mike Leigh’s delightful ‘Topsy Turvy’ this Saturday at Isfield Village Hall (6.45pm for 7pm screening, tickets £6 on the door, including wine and nibbles!). Telling the story of Gilbert and Sullivan while they were creating ‘The Mikado’, it has got us in the mood for opera!

Here are a few of our favourite opera-related films
Tales of Hoffman (1951)


We are huge fans of Powell and Pressburger here at Filmspot HQ. In this sumptuous adaptation of Offenbach’s fantasy opera, they brought together many of the team who worked on ‘The Red Shoes’. Their audatious, theatrical style works beautifully. Celebrated director Cecil B Demille is said to have written ‘For the first time in my life, I was treated to Grand Oepra where the beauty, power and scope of the music was equally matched by the visual presentation’.

The Magic Flute (1975)


Considerably lightly than many of this director’s other works, Ingmar Bergman has created an adaptation of one of Mozart’s best-loved works that is undeniably his own: a celebration of love, forgiveness, and the brotherhood of man.
Rigoletto (1993)

A shortened telling of Verdi’s masterpiece – the only criticism of this exquisite rendering of the opera is that its 30 minute run time does not do it justice. That said, it is too beautiful to overlook – Barry Purves is the master of detailed stop motion animation, sadly less known than he should be outside the animation world.
Ruddigore (1964)


British studio Halas & Batchelor’s take on Gilbert and Sullivan’s ‘Ruddigore’ is notably the first UK animated TV special, as well as being the first operetta to be animated. Made with the co-operation of the D’Oyle Carte Opera Company, who provide the voices, and the London Philharmonic Orchestra, who provide the music, it tells the story of a line of British baronets are cursed to commit a crime every day…or die!
Night at the Opera (1935)

Ok, possibly not an ‘opera film’ as such, but we had to include the Marx Brothers hilarious farce, in which they sabotage an opening night of an opera. A box office smash, the film is also considered to be one of the Marx Brothers’ finest films, being selected for inclusion in the US National Film Registry in 1993.

We hope to see you at Isfield Village Hall this Saturday!