Anthony Asquith ‘greatest hits’

We’re greatly looking forward to our screening of ‘A Cottage on Dartmoor’ tonight with composer-pianist, Joss Peach, at Fabrica in Brighton. As part of the preparations, we’ve been looking into the back catalogue of Director Anthony Asquith.

Asquith is noted for his family connections as much as for his filmography, because he was the son of the then-Prime Minister, Herbert Asquith, and is the great-uncle of Helena Bonham Carter. He entered the film industry partly to escape his high profile family background and, although often belittled because of his aristocratic lineage, he was incredibly gifted. We’ve picked out a few of his finest…

Shooting Stars (1928)

A satire of the film industry, Asquith’s first film recently had the VIP treatment, with a new restoration from the BFI in 2015. It is sophisticated in its storytelling: a love triangle, with a treacherous British starlet, who gives the title of the film a clever double meaning.

Underground (1928)

This working-class romance is like a little time capsule of 1920s London. It was only Asquith’s second film (‘Shooting Stars’ was officially credited to A.V. Bramble), but you can see the gentle humour and warmth towards his subjects that also comes through in ‘A Cottage on Dartmoor’, giving away his staunch socialist values.

Pygmalion (1938)

After the silent era, Asquith’s career declined slightly until in the late 1930s, he was involved in a number of screen adaptations of films. This, based on the play of the same name by George Bernard Shaw, staring Wendy Hiller and Leslie Howard, is delightful.

The Browning version (1951)

The first film adaptation of Terrence Rattigan’s play, Asquith’s version stars Michael Redgrave in one of the finest performances of his career, as the generally despised, but inwardly vulnerable classics teacher, ‘The Crock’, Andrew Crocker-Harris.

The Importance of Being Earnest (1952)

Asquith’s faithful adaptation of Oscar Wilde’s “Trivial Comedy for Serious People” was his first colour film, and he approached it with a characteristic understated approach – rather than being full of bold, glitzy bright colours, the film has a largely pastel palette. The breathtaking costumes designed by Cecil Beaton are also worth a mention here, and of course, Edith Evan, who absolutely made the character of Lady Bracknell her own!

As a bonus (for local interest) we recently found this little gem, also directed by Asquith – ‘On Such a Night’ – a semi-documentary film about a visit to the Glyndebourne opera! Here’s the trailer:

Hopefully we’ll see you tonight at Fabrica – for full details, and to book, please visit Eventbrite

After this, we have the launch of the Bookshop Screening Room at Waterstones Brighton next Thursday, 9 February – tickets have already sold out, but details of future screenings and a full report will be posted shortly.

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Isfield Community Cinema – open day this Saturday!

We are delighted to be working with Isfield Village Hall to bring regular community cinema nights to Isfield Village Hall. For those of you in the area, we shall be at the Village Hall this weekend, as part of their Open Day, from 11am – 4pm.

Our first film screening is going to be on Saturday 18 April, doors at 7pm (for 7.30pm start), and we are asking visitors to the open day this Saturday to vote for which film they would like us to run at our first film night. So that you can begin your deliberations, here are the trailers for the five possible films:

Singin’ in the Rain (1954)

 

Belleville Rendezvous (2003)

Life of Pi (2012)

Close Encounters of the Third Kind (1977)

The Ladykillers (1955)

…we hope to see you on Saturday when you come to cast your vote!

The Open Day will be a great opportunity to find out about the many different activities that you can get involved in at Isfield Village Hall!

CMPCA Pop Up Cinema Club: Update

Following on from our successful screening of ‘It Happened One Night’ at St Michael’s Hall in Brighton in February, we are now looking forward to our upcoming live-scored screening of the atmospheric ‘Cottage on Dartmoor’ on Saturday 25 April, . We will be screening the film at St Nicholas Church, and we are very pleased to be joined by Joss Peach, who will perform his own score to accompany the film on piano.

Tickets cost £7 in advance, or £8 on the door

To book, email info@lja.uk.com or call 01273 328683.